×

Welcome to the Slashdot Beta site -- learn more here. Use the link in the footer or click here to return to the Classic version of Slashdot.

Thank you!

Before you choose to head back to the Classic look of the site, we'd appreciate it if you share your thoughts on the Beta; your feedback is what drives our ongoing development.

Beta is different and we value you taking the time to try it out. Please take a look at the changes we've made in Beta and  learn more about it. Thanks for reading, and for making the site better!

Prime Minister Wiretapped — Vast Corruption Upending Turkey's Government

Unknown Lamer posted about 4 months ago | from the spring-turns-to-winter dept.

Politics 123

cold fjord writes with an update on the political upheaval happening in Turkey "From the article: 'Dawn raids last Tuesday nabbed almost 60 people and implicated three government ministries, the directors of state banks, and some of Turkey's most powerful businessmen in a massive corruption probe spread across three different cases. Three members of Turkey's cabinet resigned on Christmas Day, and one called on Erdogan to follow suit as accusations of kickbacks, smuggling, and abuse of office continue to mount. The scandal has even acquired an international dimension as suspicions that Iran has been using Turkey's banks to shirk sanctions were further bolstered by the arrest of Reza Sarraf, an Iranian businessmen who is accused of bribing the Economic Minister while coordinating transactions from Iran worth $120 billion. The AKP is scrambling to defend itself by claiming the arrests are a result of a dastardly foreign conspiracy ... while police officials have been removed and reshuffled and special prosecutors appointed to a degree that makes Nixon's Saturday Night Massacre look like exemplary justice. The Turkish press continues to eagerly publish the latest colorful details that emerge from the probe, including police reports of $500,000 bribes administered in boxes of chocolate and news that Erdoan himself was being wiretapped as part of the investigation.' Erdogan has been urged to resign, three days ago Turkey banned journalists from entering police stations, and police are using tear gas on protesters."

cancel ×
This is a preview of your comment

No Comment Title Entered

Anonymous Coward 1 minute ago

No Comment Entered

123 comments

OK.. (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45782585)

News for nerds? - Nope.

Stuff that matters? - Nope.

Line starts here to bitch about story on front page.

Re:OK.. (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45782625)

Hi there! You're clueless about what constitutes new for nerds and what matters! We've got story after story on Slashdot about intelligence agencies with people making claims that they must be doing it to politicians. Here is a case of a national leader being wiretapped, and you claim "Nope" "Nope". That is before the question of a NATO ally's government staring into the chasm is considered, and the possible ties to Iranian sanctions busting. You are truly clueless.

Indeed. (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45782743)

We've got story after story on Slashdot about intelligence agencies with people making claims that they must be doing it to politicians. Here is a case of a national leader being wiretapped, ...

Where in any of the links does this have anything to do with foreign (i.e. NSA) wiretapping? So what, local authorites are wiretapping.

The wiretapping was done by Turkish authorities to catch corruption in their own government.

It has nothing to do with the NSA other than a vague accusation of foreign conspiracy of some sorts in an attempt to deflect accusations.

So ANY wiretapping story is gonna be automatically considered an NSA story?

Clueless indeed.

Re:Indeed. (1, Insightful)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 4 months ago | (#45783467)

Consider the NSA likely knew all this and used the information like Machiavelli.

Consider the NSA likely knows of 100 equally volatile potential scandals world wide and is using that information.

All these things ARE within the NSA's job description. Doing the same thing to all three branches of the US government and the press is not.

I for one, want to see what the NSA has on 'my' senators (Feinstein stepped into it by defending them). They've collected it, we should force them to reveal it. Just so everybody knows exactly what they're up to (they referring to both congresscritters and the NSA).

Still hoping Snowden got those files. (Congress, Executive, Judicial, Press, Banking).

Don't give them the clicks (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45782851)

This is just a lame attempt to direct traffic to businessinsider, that mediocre "news" source edited by a guy that can't legally work in the securities industry ever again after being charged with fraud by the SEC.

Re:OK.. (2, Insightful)

Adam Colley (3026155) | about 4 months ago | (#45782639)

It matters and to suggest it doesn't just shows what a myopic moron you are.
The islamists are taking over the asylum and they're a bit too close for my liking.
This is a country that wants to get into the EU? I think they have a bit of work to do before that... Like providing basic rights to their citizens rather than operating a government that makes Argentina at its 30 year ago worst look positively angelic by comparison.
Perhaps Mr Anonymous Coward would have a different view if he lived in a country rapidly going down the Thomas.

Re:OK.. (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45782671)

The islamists are taking over the asylum and they're a bit too close for my liking.

Ah yes, the thinly veiled racism. They're brown people with names you don't know how to pronounce. That makes them evil, right?

Is it just me or is every Google+ user that posts to slashdot a douchebag?

Re:OK.. (4, Insightful)

tgv (254536) | about 4 months ago | (#45782729)

Well, there is a point to "the islamists are taking over". It is a power struggle between Erdogan's party, which has a bit of an islamist agenda, and the Gülen movement, which is an islamist movement, whose goals are unclear. Turkey has always had a "deep state", mainly secular, Atatürk-oriented, which has done some ghastly things. And now either islamist movement is interfering there. It's not racism. It might be bigoted, but racism?

BTW, Turks are not brown people, although a few do have unpronounceable names.

Re:OK.. (1)

Savage-Rabbit (308260) | about 4 months ago | (#45783505)

Well, there is a point to "the islamists are taking over". It is a power struggle between Erdogan's party, which has a bit of an islamist agenda, and the Gülen movement, which is an islamist movement, whose goals are unclear. Turkey has always had a "deep state", mainly secular, Atatürk-oriented, which has done some ghastly things. And now either islamist movement is interfering there. It's not racism. It might be bigoted, but racism?

BTW, Turks are not brown people, although a few do have unpronounceable names.

The leaders of the USA have also done ghastly and unspeakable things over the years. This might seem embarrassing to Turkey but can you imagine a corruption probe exposing the fact that US cabinet members and the president are as hopelessly corrupt? I mean we all know that most US political leaders they are corrupt to various degrees as they are in most countries but can you imagine the FBI raiding major corporations, wall-street banks, wiretapping the white house and hauling these bozos into court? At least Turkish law enforcement still has enough backbone to mount an operation like this. It would take another Snowden, sheltering in some secure foreign location safe from being kidnapped, gagged and locked away like the "Man in the Iron Mask" to expose this kind of graft in the US administration.

Re:OK.. About the Gülen movement (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45783769)

Well, there is a point to "the islamists are taking over". It is a power struggle between Erdogan's party, which has a bit of an islamist agenda, and the Gülen movement, which is an islamist movement, whose goals are unclear. Turkey has always had a "deep state", mainly secular, Atatürk-oriented, which has done some ghastly things. And now either islamist movement is interfering there. It's not racism. It might be bigoted, but racism?

BTW, Turks are not brown people, although a few do have unpronounceable names.

Actually, you would be surprised to know that the Gülen movement encourages inter-religious dialogue and is one of the most progressive Islamic schools when it comes to women's rights and dialogue with the West. [wikipedia.org]

Well, at least I was surprised. Apparently, not all Islamic schools/movements are Islamist.

Re:OK.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45782739)

The islamists are taking over the asylum and they're a bit too close for my liking.

Ah yes, the thinly veiled racism.

Because Islam is a race, sure.

This is a country that wants to get into the EU?

Sadly it's more like the other way around ..

Re:OK.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45782751)

Oh look, another Anonymous Coward making absurd and irrelevant accusations of racism. Turkey doesn't need islamists, even of "moderate" type (there are NO moderate islamists, only lying and honest islamists). It needs good governance free of corruption, while the current government is needlessly authoritarian in management methods (the whole park thing earlier...), as well as clearly very corrupt.

Re:OK.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45783591)

Indeed. Islam is a violent theory of suppressing other ideas by means of war. And no, it's a mental desease that can be cured by not believing into it. Exactly like Stalinism.

Re:OK.. (1)

mc6809e (214243) | about 4 months ago | (#45782951)

Ah yes, the thinly veiled racism. They're brown people with names you don't know how to pronounce.

Ah, yes, the not so thinly veiled stupidity that confuses race and religion.

Religion is a personal choice, you moron. At least it should be.

Re:OK.. (4, Interesting)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 4 months ago | (#45783019)

Religion is a personal choice, you moron. At least it should be.

You might want to get out in the real world a bit more. Religion is often what you're born with. Yes, it would be nice if everyone got to pick and chose after careful deliberation, but that rarely happens. And, in many places in the world, religion is also a tag or badge or category that places significant restrictions on your life at many levels.

Very few countries have the separation between church and state that is jealously guarded in the US.

Re:OK.. (4, Insightful)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | about 4 months ago | (#45783139)

Many Americans are shocked to find out how religion and the state are still tied together in even Western Europe.

They are doing still stuff that was ruled out in the US before the revolution.

In a lot of ways the fact that America is so religious is due to the separation allowing for more freedom and diversity.

Re:OK.. (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45783313)

Turkey is more secular than the USA. In the courts in TR u don't take an oath on holy books. Prime ministers take oath on constitution. Not saying "God bless Turkey" . On Turkish money there are pictures of Ataturk and Turkish scientists. No "In God we trust" on our money either ;)

Re:OK.. (1)

ColdWetDog (752185) | about 4 months ago | (#45783501)

Turkey is more secular than the USA. In the courts in TR u don't take an oath on holy books. Prime ministers take oath on constitution. Not saying "God bless Turkey" . On Turkish money there are pictures of Ataturk and Turkish scientists. No "In God we trust" on our money either ;)

That may well be 'superficial secularism'. If indeed, the Turkish government is closely tied with a single religious faction and grants extra power to that faction, the window dressing makes little difference.

And you don't have to swear on Bibles in the US if you are so inclined.

IMHO, the Church / State separation is not as assiduously maintained as it should be (along with separation of powers, the Constitution, the Bill of Rights and a couple of other useful documents and concepts).

Re: OK.. (4, Insightful)

Nocturna81 (1427457) | about 4 months ago | (#45784645)

Why is it then, that you better be Christian if you hope to attain any position of power in the good 'ol USA? Talk about superficial secularity.

Re: OK.. (1)

the eric conspiracy (20178) | about 4 months ago | (#45784877)

Uh....

14 US Senators do not avow that they are Christian.

Re: OK.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45785303)

Wow only 86% christian, how diverse of you...

Re: OK.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45785535)

RU Moron? The point of the question is the claim that you have to be Christian to achieve a position of power in the US.

CLEARLY that is not true.

Re:OK.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45785383)

It doesn't seem to be superficial to me: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Secularism_in_Turkey
From what I understand, they just happen to have a religious party at the helm today (which is not constitution)

Re:OK.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45783323)

Also a significant proportion of Turkish population consists of atheists and agnostics

Re:OK.. (0)

mc6809e (214243) | about 4 months ago | (#45783143)

You might want to get out in the real world a bit more. Religion is often what you're born with.

I'm not sure I'm willing to give thoughtless people a pass.

But suppose I grant that you're right. It still doesn't change things much because skin color doesn't matter much at all while a belief system does matter.

The rightness or wrongness of judging has nothing to do with whether or not the object of our judgement is responsible or not. We shouldn't judge based on skin color because skin color is mostly irrelevant. But the religious belief that infidels (like me) should be killed is very relevant to me, and I don't give a damn if one was born into that belief system or chose it. I judge it as wrong and dangerous.

Re:OK.. (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 4 months ago | (#45784875)

. Religion is often what you're born with. Yes, it would be nice if everyone got to pick and chose after careful deliberation, but that rarely happens.

That is actually what many of the fights around extreme Islam are about: convert, leave, or die. That also goes for the local Muslims since they are often not considered pius enough for the tastes of al Qaida. The fact that al Qaida kills many Muslims has been costing them significant amounts of support in the Muslim world.

The current Turkish leadership has been playing footsy with Iran and other extremist elements. That have been sowing the seeds of future trouble.

There are many people in Africa turning to both Islam and Christianity.

Re:OK.. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45783267)

Don't worry about Turkey, the islamists are already doing a pretty good job taking over France, the UK and other parts of western europe.

Re:OK.. (1)

sumdumass (711423) | about 4 months ago | (#45785481)

I don't think he said it wasn't important, he said how is this news for nerds. Or in other words, why is it on slashdot's front page. Where is the nerd/geek connection.

Re:OK.. (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45782725)

Actually, it does matter. There is no major news agency in Europe reporting about this outside of Turkey. One could argue that this is because the EU doesn't want the public to form a negative attitude towards Turkey. After all, Turkey is scheduled to join the EU in a decade as its largest member, giving it the largest vote and at the same time becoming the largest benefactor of EU subsidies. Why the EU Council wants this so badly is stuff for tin foil hatters. But anyway, this is definitely about freedom of information and manipulation of the news. Posting AC because I'm just that paranoid to vent my opinion.

Re:OK.. (2)

gl4ss (559668) | about 4 months ago | (#45782825)

...yeah, right.

this must be the 234th "uuu news aren't reporting about this!!" shit piece of commentary I've read this year about this and that - every fucking time it has been about something that the news orgs were in fact reporting about. I don't know why the fuck this myth about turkish problems persists - since fuck, the news are reporting it! THE PROBLEM IS THAT THE FUCKING DOLTS WHO REPEAT THE LIE THAT THE NEWS AREN'T REPORTING ABOUT IT ARE IN FACT NOT READING THE NEWS, but still want to appear like they keep up to date and care and shit.

http://yle.fi/uutiset/turkin_hallituskriisi_syvenee_jo_kolmas_ministeri_erosi_korruptiosotkujen_takia/7001035 [yle.fi]

that's a finnish broadcasting company(that is, bbc equivalent, paid out of tax dollars) news about it.. plenty of news on other sources as well. but as I said the people who want to be seen politically active nowadays don't even fucking read the fucking news, they just repeat what they read on some blog while getting high.

look man, even if you don't actively go to read news every day then you would know the fucked up situation in turkey, the protests and all.

The wiretapping part is the news for nerds (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45783401)

The wiretapping part is the news for nerds. The spying, bribes, corruption, illegal money transfers, police crackdowns and hoarde of politicians jumping ship is the stuff that matters. On slow news days you will read too much fluff. If you already have all that I described, it usually means that what you are looking at is the tip of the iceberg. And yeah, this stuff matters.

They named a country after a bird? (0)

alen (225700) | about 4 months ago | (#45782597)

That you eat?
And there is corruption there?
No way

Re:They named a country after a bird? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45782679)

an Iranian businessmen who is accused of bribing the Economic Minister while coordinating transactions from Iran worth $120 billion.

Just as the French catch "the English disease", the English catch "the French disease", and incomprehensible things are "all Greek" to English-speaking people, we have a nice local phrase along similar lines: "Turkish economy". ;-)

Re:They named a country after a bird? (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 4 months ago | (#45782761)

Personally I'm in favour of "Turkish Delight."

Re:They named a country after a bird? (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 4 months ago | (#45783493)

5th or 6th definition in the 'Urban dictionary'?

Re:They named a country after a bird? (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 4 months ago | (#45783523)

As available on Amazon.com [amazon.com], and as understood by the overwhelming majority of the population that knows the term.

You seem to have at a strange compulsion, probably more than one.

Re:They named a country after a bird? (1)

Panoptes (1041206) | about 4 months ago | (#45782681)

I don't know which is worse - the ignorance, or the illogicality, of this puerile post.

Re: They named a country after a bird? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45782685)

The bird was named after the country. It was firs known as turkey bird which then became turkey.

Re:They named a country after a bird? (1)

SpaceCracker (939922) | about 4 months ago | (#45782707)

Here is some trivia: in Hebrew that bird is called 'Hodu' which is also used in that language as the name of a country you call in English 'India'.
Rumor has it there is corruption there too.
Is that a coincidence or what?

Re:They named a country after a bird? (1)

matria (157464) | about 4 months ago | (#45782723)

Actually it is fully named "taregol hodu", meaning Indian chicken. If you can find any country in the world where there isn't rampant corruption and bribery and other shenanigans, I'd like to hear about it. Try reading the Miami news for a while.

Re:They named a country after a bird? (1)

lxs (131946) | about 4 months ago | (#45782911)

If you can find any country in the world where there isn't rampant corruption and bribery and other shenanigans, I'd like to hear about it.

Here you go. [transparency.org] Denmark seems rather nice.

Re:They named a country after a bird? (1)

SpaceCracker (939922) | about 4 months ago | (#45783433)

I read somewhere that 'Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.'
That mayst been some olden goings on tither.
Seems like they've bettered themselves since.

Re:They named a country after a bird? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45785471)

I read somewhere that 'Something is rotten in the state of Denmark.'

[Citation needed]

(grin)

Re:They named a country after a bird? (1, Interesting)

cold fjord (826450) | about 4 months ago | (#45783103)

There is corruption, and then there is Corruption. I can't imagine paying a bribe in the Western world as part of a driver's license application. But there are countries where that is necessary, and similar arrangements are needed for basic interaction with the government or other institutions. That is a fight that various parts of the world fight, and which drives the public mad. The people hate the corruption, but then when given a job in which they can extract payments too few people resist the temptation or social pressure to extract the payments to pass on to the tribe or extended family. That explains some of the attraction of political Islam. The Islamists rightly decry corruption, and Muslim people turn to them, but the results are almost always disappointing. In time corruption rears its head and you are still stuck with the hand and head chopping and other harsh laws brought by the Islamists, and the corruption continues.

Re:They named a country after a bird? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45782979)

Is that a coincidence or what?

Yes.

While this is a great example of a typical coincidence it is good to remember that correlation by itself doesn't prove a common cause but rather gives an indication of whether there is a point to look for a common cause at all.

Re:They named a country after a bird? (2)

ImdatS (958642) | about 4 months ago | (#45783031)

The funniest thing? In Turkish, that bird is called "Hindi", which assumes that the bird came from India...

Etymology (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45783547)

Peru in Portuguese, Dinde (d'Inde = "from India") in French. And my cultural background (Asterix) tells me that said India must have been America when they were thought to be the same land by the Western Europeans.

Re:They named a country after a bird? (1)

giorgist (1208992) | about 4 months ago | (#45783973)

Well in Greek, a Turkey is called a "Gallos" and and a French mand is also called a "Gallos", and Americans hate the French. Is there a connection ?

Re:They named a country after a bird? (3, Interesting)

vux984 (928602) | about 4 months ago | (#45783405)

Its actually pretty interesting to read where the various state names originated. People don't really think about them, but its almost invariably not nearly all that ... impressive.

Half a dozen at least are named for Kings and Queens (Carolinas, Georgia, Louisiana, Virginias...) New York is named for the Duke of York. Kind of amusing the names stuck what with the revolution and all.

Indiana is roughly 'land of indians'
Oklahoma is literally 'red person' in a native dialect
Caliornia is 'hot oven' in spanish
Vermont is 'green mountain' in french

And perhaps most amusing Texas amusingly is "hello friend'.

With only minor changes in history, we could have had a nuclear superpower named roughly "The Republic of Hey Buddy"

Names are funny things. :p

Re:They named a country after a bird? (2)

Phil-14 (1277) | about 4 months ago | (#45783627)

Texas is named for Tiles, because one of the earliest parts settled had red soil suitable for making roofing tiles from. Spanish has shifted its spelling/prononciation a bit between then and now.

Re:They named a country after a bird? (2)

Arker (91948) | about 4 months ago | (#45783745)

Eh, not quite.

California means nothing, it's a word that a novelist made up and appeared as a fictional land in "Las sergas de EsplandiÃn" - a book which the conquistadores were familiar with, and from which they drew the name.

Your other entries appear to be correct though.

what kind of box (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 4 months ago | (#45782661)

police reports of $500,000 bribes administered in boxes of chocolate and news that Erdoan himself was being wiretapped as part of the investigation.'

That must be a big box to hide that many bills

Re:what kind of box (0)

gweihir (88907) | about 4 months ago | (#45782699)

400 bills of 1000EUR each are not that much volume. Europe has money that is hard to conterfit, unlike some countries with paper money on the quality-level of 3rd world countries, like the US.

Re:what kind of box (2)

phantomfive (622387) | about 4 months ago | (#45782757)

Europe has money that is hard to conterfit, unlike some countries with paper money on the quality-level of 3rd world countries, like the US.

It was once thought impossible to counterfeit the Euro, but since then counterfeits are up (here is one example [securitymanagement.com]). With modern printing technology improving and becoming cheaper, the counterfeiters are becoming more and more sophisticated. Any security feature that is widely known can be copied.

Which is why both Europe and the US are constantly working to improve their currency. You apparently are not aware of that, but check out the latest security features. [newmoney.gov] They are kind of cool.

Re:what kind of box (-1, Flamebait)

gweihir (88907) | about 4 months ago | (#45782789)

You obviously neither understood the question, nor my answer to it.

Re:what kind of box (2, Insightful)

cold fjord (826450) | about 4 months ago | (#45782845)

Your original answer was 10 words that actually answered the question. You then went on a 25 word rant about the US. Yes, we've noticed you don't like the US. The post you replied to above was correct, and more on topic to you than you were to the original.

Your first post is tedious axe grinding. It would be nice if you could give it a rest for a day, or is it a strong and compelling obsession to you?

Re:what kind of box (1)

gweihir (88907) | about 4 months ago | (#45783831)

No, my answer was 35 words that explain what is going on. That you think it is a "rant", that I point out that the quality of paper-money in the US is too low to allow $1000 bills only shows your ignorance or that standards that the modern world applies to paper money.

Re:what kind of box (1)

phantomfive (622387) | about 4 months ago | (#45783955)

that I point out that the quality of paper-money in the US is too low to allow $1000 bills only shows your ignorance

It shows that you don't understand the quality of modern USD paper money. But whatever, who cares.

Re:what kind of box (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 4 months ago | (#45784131)

That you think it is a "rant", that I point out that the quality of paper-money in the US is too low to allow $1000 bills only shows your ignorance or that standards that the modern world applies to paper money.

If the standards of the "modern world" include accuracy for questions of fact, you aren't living up to them.

Currency Facts [moneyfactory.gov]

United States currency denominations above $100 are not available from the Department of the Treasury, the Federal Reserve System, or the Bureau of Engraving and Printing. On July 14, 1969, the Department of the Treasury and the Federal Reserve System announced that currency notes in denominations of $500, $1,000, $5,000, and $10,000 would be discontinued immediately due to lack of use. Although they were issued until 1969, they were last printed in 1945.

The US Treasury could print new $1,000 bills if it wanted to, it wouldn't be a problem.

Interesting that the year the US defeated Germany and Japan in WW2 was the last year they printed $1,000 bills.

There is amateur, and there is pro (1)

smitty_one_each (243267) | about 4 months ago | (#45783009)

When you're a pro, you just delegate the counterfeiting to "Zimbabwe" Ben Bernanke, or Janet "Weiss" Yellen.

Re:what kind of box (1)

benjfowler (239527) | about 4 months ago | (#45783041)

The biggest euro note being issued is the 500 euro note:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/500_euro_note [wikipedia.org]

They're nicknamed "bin Ladens": everyone has heard of them, and knows what they look like, but noone's actually seen one.

The only people who really favour them are drug dealers and other shady characters moving dirty money. It's said that in a study, all the 500 euro notes they could find were contaminated with cocaine. Part of the reason why they're no longer manufactured in many countries.

Re:what kind of box (1)

aaarrrgggh (9205) | about 4 months ago | (#45783255)

A USD$100 bill first issued in 1929 would be comparable to $1,300 today inflation adjusted. While things are certainly different, there are still plenty of legal things where cash is king and large bills make sense today.

Re:what kind of box (1)

dunkelfalke (91624) | about 4 months ago | (#45783929)

I actually had one once (was a birthday present). Got rid of it as soon as possible. Never heard the one about "bin Ladens", though.

education (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45782675)

One of the first steps to change the world should be to reeducate our police officers to make them recognize they're affected by all this shit too. A big part of the police and military training is aimed at dehumanizing and making robots out of people. But their brains are still there, you just have to reach them.

Wiretapped by... ? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45782705)

So some turkish banks were caught helping some unnamedIranian actors.

Then some members of the Turkish cabinet, bank manages and the prime minister himself have been forced or are about to resign, because ...

Some providential wiretaps show some wrongdoings.

Who ordered those wiretaps and when?

 

Re:Wiretapped by... ? (1, Flamebait)

SpaceCracker (939922) | about 4 months ago | (#45782745)

The Turkish police didn't really have to place wiretaps to listen in on Erdogan.
They could have asked the NSA for recordings.

Re:Wiretapped by... ? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45782843)

So is the Turkish police interested in acting against their own higher ranks?

Curious.

The truly bizarre aspect of this (1, Offtopic)

cold fjord (826450) | about 4 months ago | (#45782715)

The truly bizarre aspect of this is that it involves aspects of a power struggle involving the Turkish PM and a Turkish Imam currently residing in the US.

Turkish imam Fethullah Gulen wields power from self-imposed exile [ft.com]

The more extreme Islamists in power are facing challenge from more moderate Muslims.

I hope it turns out well, or Turkey is in trouble. Erdogan has already managed to yank out many of the checks on the government that have long existed, as well as cozying up with Iran.

Re:The truly bizarre aspect of this (3, Informative)

phantomfive (622387) | about 4 months ago | (#45782775)

You're the first person I've ever heard call Erdogan a Muslim extremist. Authoritarian, sure, but generally he's considered a secularist.

Re:The truly bizarre aspect of this (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45782815)

He's a "secularlist" in name only. He's using the fundamentalists to consolidate power. The extremists have made a lot of power gains during his reign.

Re:The truly bizarre aspect of this (1)

HornWumpus (783565) | about 4 months ago | (#45782847)

As a practical matter: I hope the NSA has as much dirt on his replacement, as they had on him.

I sure wish Snowden would go ahead and release all the NSA dirt on our politicians/judges (esp supreme court judges)/reporters/CEOs etc. But the NSA likely had those files locked down well.

Re:The truly bizarre aspect of this (1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45783119)

It is his outside portrait that is accepted as secularist which is beginning to shatter since Gezi. In Turkey he has always been known to be a hard roots muslim extremist. But anyone pointing it out is quickly discredited by the major media in Turkey and totally ignored by any media outlets abroad. He even has a conviction for "Inciting people to hatred and hostility" for a religious speech he delivered.

Re:The truly bizarre aspect of this (4, Informative)

Mashiki (184564) | about 4 months ago | (#45783385)

You're the first person I've ever heard call Erdogan a Muslim extremist. Authoritarian, sure, but generally he's considered a secularist.

You must not pay too much attention to what he's actually doing and said. If he's a secularist, then it should be very easy for you to explain why he's pushing for the destruction of churches, and blames everything "on da juice"(aka the Jews), and why he just went on a massive hunt, imprison, and disappearing act against the secular members of the military leadership. Going as far as imprisoning members who were responsible for installing a secular government the last time around and making those individuals actually disappear after a very quick show trial, then installing generals who are devoutly muslim.

Secular this guy is not.

Re:The truly bizarre aspect of this (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45783941)

I also don't think Erdogan is an extremist ... but he certainly has very strong Muslim leanings. Much more than any Turkish leader in the past 100 years would dare exhibit.

*If* you'd like to learn how Erdogan is NOT a secularist:

Erdogan’s Turkey: Less nationalism, more Islam [timesofisrael.com]

or just Google "erdogan islam".

Re:The truly bizarre aspect of this (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about 4 months ago | (#45783007)

...power struggle involving the Turkish PM and a Turkish Imam currently residing in the US.

Has all the trappings of a coup attempt. William J. Donovan would be proud of what his creation has become.

Re:The truly bizarre aspect of this (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 4 months ago | (#45783039)

If you imprison the political opposition it isn't uncommon for them to leave the country. On the outside they tend to be beyond your reach.

Re:The truly bizarre aspect of this (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about 4 months ago | (#45783165)

It's also not uncommon for them to attempt a takeover from "beyond your reach", especially with a little help from their "friends".

Re:The truly bizarre aspect of this (1)

cold fjord (826450) | about 4 months ago | (#45783189)

Yes, well both Khomeini and Lenin would know about that. I don't think Donovan's crew had much to do with them.

Re:The truly bizarre aspect of this (1)

fustakrakich (1673220) | about 4 months ago | (#45783425)

With Khomeini they certainly did. The Shah's death was expected, and they needed somebody to put in to keep the commies out. The hostage deal was just PR addon, if not revenge for George Bush being fired from the CIA.. Lenin? I'm sure he was getting help from somebody [wildboar.net]. Heh, turns out to be that same old bunch that the CIA/NSA/DEA/FBI/etc.. actually serve today. There's just nothing new these days *sigh*

Please note the major economic issue here (and that's what really counts) is that markets are saturated, in both labor and product. Destabilization, panic, and "crises" are needed to keep prices and the entire market empire from collapsing completely. Social and economic stratification are becoming harder to sustain. So, we need this perpetual warfare. There is every reason to play both sides. It's for our own good.

Take a page (0)

girlintraining (1395911) | about 4 months ago | (#45782765)

Take a page from the US play book: Just fine their companies a fraction of the profit they made from it, tell everyone it was the "harshest penalties ever handed out" for such a conspiracy, and then reiterate their commitment to the "consumers" affected by the "isolated" case of fraud.

Real reason: power struggle (4, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45782805)

Fethullah Gulen [wikipedia.org] has a huge following in Turkey. His disciples have invaded the police forces. They became buddies with Turkey PM to reach their anti-secularist agenda. They crippled the Turkish army [wikipedia.org] using their pawn police and pawn judges.

The economy looks strong and religious zealots are praising the PM and this is getting to his head. He forgets that it is Fethullah that actually controls everything in Pennsylvania and he openly started fighting Fethullah by banning prep schools, which is the main source of fresh meat for Fethullah. (there must be other behind the scene issues, but we dont know them yet). That link is the Zaman newspaper, which is also owned by Fethullah [todayszaman.com]

So now Fethullah/CIA is tired of PM's shit and they are unveiling what was already known for who knows how long. Interesting things are unfolding if you are Turkish.

Conspiracy (1)

Xas (1230578) | about 4 months ago | (#45782829)

Erdogan likes to blame things on others so much. During the huge country wide protests in May and June, he blamed it on foreign powers, interest lobbies, international media and his political rivals. Now he blames them all plus protesters. It isn't hard to guess why; his voters are comparably less educated and more prone to believe everything bad comes from "infidel seculars" and "infidel foreigners". This time he isn't completely wrong however. He has been crossing swords with Fethullah Gulen, leader of an international muslim community for some time. He had been supporting Erdogan even before his rise to power, and pulled lots of strings for his benefit. Now the tables have turned. Gulen has excessive control over government bodies, judicial system and the police organization. This is going to be bloody.

Obama's Red Dawn (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45782975)

When the evidence emerges of direct involvement and coordination by U.S. Dept. of Treasury and Justice and White House at the highest administrative levels for the $120 billion in cash transactions to Iran, Obama's Red Dawn will rise and the night of his Junta will be at hand.

Good News (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45783063)

This means Turkey is becoming more westernized (meaning more like the USA). In the USA we had a sitting president (President Clinton) take bribes from the PRC (in the form of paper bags full of campaign contributions), and the only thing the media will focus on is a blow job. Seriously once we get turkey and all the other radical governments aligned with the western ideal of one world order, there will be no need for theses petty national squabbles. It will be one currency, and one government who will look after the best interest of its citizens in the most benevolent manner possible. By the most benevolent manner possible I mean the rights holders will make the vast majority of the surplus population its virtual slave.

Liberals believe man is helpless and needs to be supported by the benevolent elite. The elite only become elite by taking advantage of the poor. They also make most of their elite money by helping the poor. The Conservative believes only the individual will ever have his own best interest in mind while making decisions. The Democrats and Republicans both agree to take advantage of the poor, and stupid to further the interests of the rights holders who control the government (whether that be Disney, or the Peoples Republic of China).

In a just society there is a level of shame involved with taking bribes. (the former president of S. Korea killed himself when he was caught up in a bribery scandal). In the USA, and apparently Turkey (our new Western partner in the war on something) it is just business as usual. I guess the world borders really are rapidly disintegrating. We in the USA are just like Russia. We too believe in total control of the population, seperating kids from their parents for not supporting the agenda of the state. Yet there are still places in the world where western theocracy hasn't crept in. We need to bomb the fuck out of these places. Places such as Yemen. Only when the entire population of the world is enslaved (uggh i mean liberated) by one world government and it's corporate interests will the world truly be set free.

Some more juicy news (5, Insightful)

Twelfth Harmonic (3464759) | about 4 months ago | (#45783147)

The absurdity of the story and the tragic situation Turkey has been in for the last decade cannot be overestimated.

- This is a power struggle between an Imam who lives in a mansion in Pennsylvania vs. his servant.

- In the past week, 5 ministers resigned. That is almost %20 of the cabinet

- In the past two days, almost all the police chiefs in the country were suspended

- When district attorneys ordered police to arrest some key businessmen, police refused. Eventhough this is a constitutional offense and has a penalty of jailtime, no one is on trial

- A reshuffle is expected tonight or tomorrow. Definitely before weekend. The servant wants to pick up the pieces but the Imam is bent on destroying them

- These fractions were once united through their belief in Allah and were hell-bent on destroying the old regime which they claim was built by American servants and godless infidels

- No Muslim country in the area would interfere if these two fractions are to murder each other this very moment. Just like Assad is murdering his country and destroying history that dates before religion and no one does anything useful

List goes on and on and on. You wouldn't care and I can't blame you. Just know that these are not much different from any other crazy religious people in the world. Just like anywhere else in the world, there are some people in this country who are harming its future. The mistake is that they are ruling now. This too shall pass.

Re:Some more juicy news (2)

couchslug (175151) | about 4 months ago | (#45783953)

Only the ruthlessness of an Ataturk and the military which succeeded him can bring modernity and secular order to move such an Islamic country forward. Turks rightly admire Kemal Ataturk, but unless enough are willing to pick up a gun they will become prey for the fundamentalists. Theocratic superstitions (all of them) are only able to see democracy as a stepping-stone to their takeover of the State. Those who would resist superstition had better be willing to kill for their freedom. Ataturk and the Young Turks were willing, and they made tremendous progress. We shall see if that progress will be reversed.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mustafa_Kemal_Atat%C3%BCrk [wikipedia.org]

Re:Some more juicy news (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45785445)

Says a Kurd, speaking from his PKK cave, planning his next lethal terrorist attack for killing more infants and innocent people in a shopping mall.

Syria sarin gas perhaps? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45783363)

If it does not have something to do with Turkey supplying weapons and SARIN GAS ingredients to Syrian Insurgents...?! Syria is going, you know where, and now the ones entangled with recent Syrian Terrorist support, well... It's all just simple assumptions.

The NSA thinks (?) (1)

Ian Grant (3082979) | about 4 months ago | (#45783791)

And the NSA thinks "Whew. Dodged that one!"

Re:The NSA thinks (?) (0)

Anonymous Coward | about 4 months ago | (#45785909)

Ah yes, here is a story about corruption in a foriegn country's government. There must be some way to involve the US. Well now, the NSA (think foriegn intelligence) must be involved somehow, so the US is once again evil and somehow related to this crisis. Wait, the US should have known about this and could have possibly prevented it. Clearly, the US is at fault as much as any other country in *any* foreign crisis.

Going into 2014.... (1)

hackus (159037) | about 4 months ago | (#45784773)

Ahem....well in case you haven't figured this out yet...

We are fast approaching a pivotal moment in this human history. We are all aware, government employs primarily people who are attracted with conquering, and destroying humanity. However, up until this point you could flee to far off lands, you could cut a kings head off and end his/her reign and the weapons that people who do like government had access to were simple cannon and pistol and later during WWII planes/missiles.

This means that regionally a continent or two would be completely destroyed, like for example Europe or Japan later with Atomic weapons.

Now, we face a large number of psychopaths world wide with weapons and technology to destroy the human race and totally enslave it with no place to run or hide.

How long will we dodge this bullet I wonder? Do we get another 5 years? Maybe another 10 years?

I don't think we have even 10 years before the human race will have to choose:

Live as slaves as equals, or face extinction.

-Hack

Load More Comments
Slashdot Account

Need an Account?

Forgot your password?

Don't worry, we never post anything without your permission.

Submission Text Formatting Tips

We support a small subset of HTML, namely these tags:

  • b
  • i
  • p
  • br
  • a
  • ol
  • ul
  • li
  • dl
  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>
Sign up for Slashdot Newsletters
Create a Slashdot Account

Loading...